Alaska Air Show Association

A Non-Profit 501C(3) Corporation

The Association recognizes PetroStar as our first sponsor of Arctic Thunder and we welcome them back as a returning Liberty sponsor.
Participating Airplanes
Aircraft Specifications Historic Significance

Harvard

Harvard

Max. Speed: 208 mph
Weight: 3,995 lbs empty
Length: 28’-11”
Wingspan: 42’
Height: 9’-9”
The Royal Air Force initially ordered what would be designated by the USAAF as the AT-6 Texan in 1938 and named it “Harvard.” In 1940, the Harvard MkIIB was built under license in Montreal for the Royal Canadian Air Force, the RAF and the USAAF, with a total 2,557 built. It is reported that in WWII an occasional Harvard would fly in to Annette Island, Alaska, where Canadian units were stationed, adding to the strength of the 11th Air Force.

1931 Fairchild American Pilgrim 100

1931 Fairchild American Pilgrim 100

Max Speed: 135 mph
Weight: 4,195 lbs empty
Length: 39’-2”
Wingspan: 57’-5”
Height: 11’-6”
First flown in 1930, the Pilgrim served as an airliner, bush plane and USAAF light cargo and supply aircraft. The Pilgrim served in all parts of Alaska and played a part in the construction of the Al-Can highway. The Pilgrim is in Alaska Airways livery, and had been hauling fish from Bristol Bay until 1985

North American Aviation AT-6 Texan

North American Aviation AT-6 Texan

Max. Speed: 208 mph
Weight: 4,158 lbs empty
Length: 28’-11”
Wingspan: 42’
Height: 9’-9”
This is a single-engine, advance trainer aircraft used during WWII. The prototype first flew in 1935, and the first models went into production in 1937. More than 17,000 were built. Our aircraft was built in 1943 and is in the Aleutian colors of aircraft flying there in WWII.

Stinson L-13 “Grasshopper”

Stinson L 13 'Grasshopper'

Max. Speed: 115 mph
Weight: 2,070 lbs empty
Length: 31’-9”
Wingspan: 42’
Height: 9’-9”
A utility aircraft first flown in 1945, used for, liaison and air ambulance duties. Following military service, some were converted for civil bush flying observation

Mitsubishi A6M Zero

Mitsubishi A6M Zero

Max. Speed: 331 mph
Weight: 3,704 lbs empty
Length: 29’-9””
Wingspan: 39’-4”
Height: 10’-0”
The Zero was a long-range fighter aircraft operated by the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service from 1940-5, and was considered the most capable carrier-based fighter in the world. It had excellent maneuverability, long range and a legendary reputation as a dogfighter. The Zero was involved in the air raid over Dutch harbor on June 4, 1942. Many flight characteristics were learned from recovering a Zero that crashed landed on Akutan Island.

Stinson V-77 “Gullwing” Reliant

Stinson V-77 “Gullwing” Reliant

Max. Speed: 177 mph
Weight: 3,045 lbs empty
Length: 27’-11”
Wingspan: 41’-7”
Height: 8’-6”
The Reliant was first flown in 1933 and used by the USAAF in WWII as a utility aircraft and as a trainer. After the war, they were sold as the Vultee V-77. There were straight and taper wing versions, which had a significant step up, giving it a distinct gull appearance. This plane became the mainstay of Alaskan bush operators, as the large flaps enabled a pilot to land heavy loads on unimproved sand bars.

Travel Air 6000

Travel Air 6000

Max. Speed: 120 mph
Weight: 2,430 lbs empty
Length: 30’-0”
Wingspan: 46’-6”
Height: 9’-0”
A six seat, high-wing, braced monoplane utility aircraft first flown in 1928. Bush pilots appreciated the ruggedness, load carrying capacity, and dependability of the Travel Airs.

Fairchild 42

Fairchild 42

Max. Speed: 130 mph
Weight: 4,158 lbs empty
Length: 30’-6”
Wingspan: 45’-6”
Height:
A 3-passenger aircraft first flown in 1927. There were a total 8 built, with one flying in Alaska. It is also a high-wing, braced monoplane. Our aircraft was built in 1929, and flown to Alaska in 1948. The aircraft was restored and took to the skies again in 1997. During winters, the airplane is fitted with skis and flown regularly into bush country.

Cessna 206

Cessna 206

Max. Speed: 175 mph Weight: 2,176 lbs empty Length: 28’- 3” Wingspan: 36’-0” Height: 9’-3.5” Six seat general aviation aircraft introduced in 1964. A popular Alaska bush plane because of its powerful engine, rugged construction, and large cabin. The plane can be fitted with floats, amphibious floats and skis.

Vultee BT-13 Valiant

Vultee BT-13 Valiant

Max. Speed: 180 mph Weight: 3,375 lbs empty Length: 28’-10” Wingspan: 42’-0” Height: 11’-6” First flown in 1939, the Valiant was a WWII-era basic trainer flown by most pilots, until the T-6 Texan took that role. It is a low-wing monoplane.

Stinson 108

Stinson 108

Max. Speed: 208 mph Weight: 1,320 lbs empty Length: 24’-6” Wingspan: 34’-0” Height: 6’-10” The Stinson 108 was produced from 1946-1950, and could carry three passengers in its fabric covered tube steel frame. Popularly used as an Alaska bush plane.

Aeroncal Model 7 Champ

Aeroncal Model 7 Champ

Max. Speed: 100 mph Weight: 740 lbs empty Length: 21’-6” Wingspan: 35’-2” Height: 7’-0” The Champ entered production in 1945, and is a two-seat (tandem) airplane with fixed gear. Popularly used as a bush plane in Alaska, the fabric covered, tube steel frame tail dragger is often fitted with large tundra tires.

Fairchild F-11 Husky

Fairchild F-11 Husky

Max. Speed: 128 mph Weight: 4,540 lbs empty Length: 38’-0” Wingspan: 54’-9” Height: 16’-3.5” First flown in 1946, the Husky was a Canadian bush plane and a direct competitor of the iconic de Havilland Beaver. With only 12 examples were produced, the Husky could carry up to 10 passengers.

Beechcraft Model 17Stagger Wing

Beechcraft Model 17Stagger Wing

Max. Speed: 212 mph Weight: 2,540 lbs empty Length: 26’-10” Wingspan: 32’-0” Height: 8’-0” Introduced in 1933, this icon of the Art Deco age is an example of a large, powerful and fast executive plane of the day. The plane features an unusual negative stagger wing configuration that maximizes pilot visibility, and reduces drag. The plane was popular in the air races of the 1930’s.

Alaska Aviation Centennial Celebration Pilots: Bart Stone, Ed Kornfield, Terry Holliday, Chuck Miller “Cricket” Renner, Jahn Hartke, Alex Roesch, Jeff Sever, Dick Benner, Burke Mees, Dennis Parrish, Ed White, Mike Hunt, Dave Helmso, and Mike Kelly. Others to be announced.